Posted by: meganlpiper | July 22, 2009

While you were sleeping…classes in Segovia!

Edu explaining the history of the Aqueduct

Edu explaining the history of the Aqueduct

While you sleep at night (You are 6 hours behind in the US), we take our three classes everyday from 9:15am to 12:30pm. Classes. We do have those here, as we are “studying” abroad.  While it may not be the main focus or the favorite part of all of us here- we have to do it. We are all together for our first two classes, History/Culture and Literature, and then we split up into an Intermediate or an Advanced Grammar class. I will teach you what these classes are like, the best, the worst, how hard it is to stay awake, and how I feel about them. Let the lesson begin:

First class of the day: History and Culture with Edu

This class is fun, interesting, and I like it. I dont find it to be hard, its just a matter of following the history. Edu is a great story teller, but I dont always follow him, lost in translation I guess. He is young, and his phone goes off at least once a day in class. We have homework once a week in our book. This is the only class that I have a book in while in Segovia. You do need notebook paper or a notebook for this one, actually for all of them. Most people bought them here, but I am happy to have a notebook that I can open and close to put papers in. Bring paper with you if you do this becasuse they dont have loose leaf notebook paper anywhere. I have been doing well in this class with the homeworks and with the one paper we have had to write.

Second class of the day: Literature with Paco

Oh Paco, what an interesting man you are! Paco leads us on our excursions on Fridays as well as teaching this class. He gets aggravted with us sometimes bc we dont stay together walking fast enough and we talk too much, but generally I think its going well. He is a grandfather type figure, wth his old man jokes and good sense of humor. His class is definitely work. We have a poem in spanish everyday, and he talks it through with us. The deep meaning, the literal spanish meaning, etc. All in Spanish though, no english at all so you need a good spanish dictionary (see the what to pack post for my recommendation). We have to write summaries of the poem every night, at least one and a half pages. I have been getting A’s on them, which I am happy about. Once, we had to memorize a famous poem in spanish, everyone is this country seems to know it. (Cordoba) I enjoy learning about the literature, but sometimes you just dont feel like writing about them. Most people dont pay attention that well in this one, trying to stay awake, but Paco also expects us to talk to him alot- interaction is key.

Third and last class of the day: Grammar with Emmy

This class is the more advanced of the two grammars. I love love love Emmy. She is so precious, and an interactive, fun teacher. She keeps us talking about our evenings or weekends or about ourselves to work on our speech. However, I have the hardest time with the material in this class. I think my foundation of spanish grammar is not very stable, which makes it hard for me to continue to build on it. We have homework in here that she goes over in class. She has only taken it up once, and we were all in trouble because we had not worked hard enough  on it. She is so cute and funny, and its a good way to end the day.

The Professors of the trip, L-R Paco, Suazo, Emi, Me, Edu, and David

The Professors of the trip, L-R Paco, Suazo, Emi, Me, Edu, and David

After class, we have the option of using the computer lab for internet for about an hour. Most of us just hang around to talk to each other or plan weekend trips. Classes should be one of the most important things here, but they arent. We help each other with homework and staying awake just to get through it so that we can have more outside of the classroom experiences here in Segovia. I hope you learned a little something, or at least now you know that I actually have been going to classes!

~M

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